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Jun 25 2007

Pose of the week, Department of Supermodel Sports

Dude nation’s increasing enthusiasm for pornulating traditionally unfuckable women is quite the victory for marginalized groups who have never enjoyed the fulfilling opportunity to celebrate their sexuality exclusively in terms of male approval.

Now disabled women can be sexbots, too, particularly when photographed on all fours with their enthonged, airbrushed butts in the air and published in empowerful women’s magazine Sports Illustrated.

[Thanks, Charles]

96 comments

3 pings

  1. teffie-phd

    You’ve come a long way baby.

    SI mentions her looks far more than her athletic or educational accomplishments. Not that I’m surprised or anything.

    I bet she makes a mean pot roast too.

    IBTP

  2. Kairos Rae

    Who runs in their underwear? I google imaged her and found this soft porn one. Whose choice were these pictures?

  3. Claire C. Cake

    This may be more of a disability issue, but I particularly enjoy [sarcasm] how in both pictures — the SI one and the one Kairos Rae linked to — Mullins is wearing her prostheses, rather than being photographed with her natural, amputated legs exposed. But then, amputation isn’t sexy unless she’s “overcoming adversity.”

  4. tinfoil hattie

    “At a recent media event, she sported fashionable white skinny jeans, gold sandals and a dark pink pedicure.”

    With the de rigeur PINK pedicure! And she’s so fashionable! Oh yeah, and she can run, too. Pretty fast. With no lower legs. Did we mention that?

    And the pinkulation (pinkification?) of women continues — I was in Bed Bath & Beyond yesterday, and it seems Calphalon has come out with a whole set of silicone bakeware in (wait for it) PINK!

    I’m so happy about all the goals we girls are reaching. Now, if only I could find some way to be deemed more fuckable! That is, after all, my life’s goal!

  5. Cass

    Y’all are crazy. I remember Roger Clemens being photographed in just this same pose a few years ago.

  6. norbizness

    Cass: It took two cases of Brazilian wax to make his ass presentable.

    But, just for clarification’s sake, if she were in spandex track shorts, the picture would be O.K., right? Because that’s generally the position a sprinter would start in.

  7. Leslie

    Roger Clemens was wearing a thong?! Hmph.

  8. Twisty

    “But, just for clarification’s sake, if she were in spandex track shorts, the picture would be O.K., right? Because that’s generally the position a sprinter would start in.” –Norbiz

    If she were in track shorts on a track, and not in a photograph, that would be one thing. But in our excellent world, a photgraph of a half-naked woman posed doggy-style in a men’s magazine, whether she is in real life a track star or not, has inescapable connotations.

  9. norbizness

    Twisty: Then I suggest that you are underestimating the ability to appreciate fine photography separate from sexual desire possessed by the average Sports Illustrated reader*. I mean, it’s in BLACK AND WHITE for God’s sake. That means “arty”!

    * plus it’s like seven months until the next Swimsuit Issue.

  10. Bird

    I blame athlete porn for the fact that I can’t go running in this damned city without being hollered at, followed or otherwise harassed.

  11. Sara

    “At a recent media event, she sported fashionable white skinny jeans, gold sandals and a dark pink pedicure,” says the article.

    In other words, “Look, Barbie, amputees can be pretty, too!”

    Or “Look, Barbie, there’s really no reason whatsoever not to submit to other people’s standards of fuckability/value.”

    Or “Look, Barbie, it’s perfectly valid to frame the expression of your own personal success as that of a viable female object who can also accomplish stuff. Look how hard it is for some people, but how hard they try anyway. And look at the rewards!”

    You have no idea how much this kind of presentation makes me want to scream and scream and scream.

    (Don’t even get me started on the wind-machine hair.)

  12. acm

    it almost makes it sound like these (pictured) legs are her “real” ones and she keeps a fashion array of other prostheses to keep her hotness factor up in social situations! eesh. (ooh, the novelty of seeing a disabled person displaying traditional sexuality! tittilating!!)

    sigh.

  13. Dawn Coyote

    Lordosis posture: butt up and back cruved in a way that just screams “mount me”. I’ve had this curve in my back my whole life. It looks ever better in high heels. Of course guys can’t help it – I just look like I’m ready to fuck.

  14. Daisy

    I think the hair does it for me. I have long hair too, and if I tried to run in wind like that, I’d run right into a building and kill myself.

    No scrunchies at Sports Illustrated!

  15. Margarita

    Are you criticising this woman or the people who have made her want to pose this way? It’s just a little hard to tell.

    Not trying to be snide or attack here, I’m just curious.

  16. Sara

    I’m sorry; I have to rant some more.

    It is my fond wish that amputees be seen as just another flavor of ordinary, not extraordinary or freakish just because we don’t have all our original body parts, so ordinary that people don’t even blink when they see us coming. If we could achieve this, it would make our lives easier and richer because we could spend less of our precious, irreplaceable lives fending off other people’s projections and could instead just get on with it all. And getting images of us out there in mainstream publications showing various among us doing ordinary or extraordinary mainstream things that would be just as ordinary or extraordinary for anyone else, things like competing in sporting events like ordinary folk, even being extremely successful at it as some people are, is definitely one very good way to go about this. It is!

    However, pornification does not equal normalization.

    Unless you’re a woman.

    Hence the screaming.

    IBTP, though I suppose that goes without saying.

  17. Hattie

    Speaking of pinkification, now you can get bedpans in pink. So you can be hot even if you are bedridden on the crapper.

  18. Daisy

    Margarita, my point was that I really doubt any serious long-haired athlete, male or female, amputee or not, runs in hurricane winds without tying their hair back in a scrunchie or rubber band.

    Sara, great post. I am old enough to remember the underground comic strip called “Amputee Love”–which was my first introduction to the amputee-fetishists.

    I was just wondering if this Sports Illustrated photo means they are going “mainstream”? What do you think?

  19. cycles

    More misuse of pink: I saw a commercial for “Pretty In Pink” earplugs for gals who want to retain their delicate femininity whilst blocking out the nightly buzzsawing of their sleeping bed-oafs.

    http://earplugstore.stores.yahoo.net/heslprinpin3.html

    I myself have been using the “flesh” colored earplugs for years. “Flesh” being, of course, white-people color. But I can see how it would be confusing to my partner; now that they’re available in pink, he’ll finally be able to comprehend that the nude tangled in the sheets next to him is, in fact, fuckable.

  20. Carol

    I hate it when looks are the primary thing mentioned in a supposedly “her against the world” article. ’cause her looks were the whole reason for the adversity, right?

  21. amandyman

    It’s been a long long while since I ran track, but I don’t remember downward dog being the ideal starting position at the blocks.

  22. PhysioProf

    “Are you criticising this woman or the people who have made her want to pose this way?”

    No one is being criticized; the patriarchy is being blamed.

  23. Bitch, Esquire

    The only nice thing I can think of at the moment (why do I bother? *shrug*) is that it’s kind of cool that an Olympic athlete catwalked for Dior, because it means that a healthy, fit body was used to model clothing, as opposed to an artificially thin one.

  24. Betsy

    The caption of the catwalk picture says she’s done some runway modeling, too! Which means one of two things:

    Either (1) she’s really a serious woman athlete, now!

    or (2) SI is an unintentional parody of itself.

  25. mearl

    I suppose this woman is the only female paraolympian athlete in the world, and she must be stuck competing against men all the time. There are NO OTHER FEMALE ATHLETES around that would merit a feature article in a major sports mag. She is, aside from Heather Mills, likely the only woman who is missing a limb. Same as those babes from Enron are the only female financial analysts out there, Ana Kournikova and Maria Sharapova the only tennis players with vaginas, Nigella Lawson the only chef who owns a pair of fallopian tubes, Kelly Ripa, Katie Couric, Paula Zahn, and any of their droid clones are the only women hosting the news. Petra Nemcova is the only female who merited interest as a survivor of the tsunami. And on and on it goes. In this age of fun feminism, you not only have to have accomplishments on your C.V., but you also have to look like a Playmate or, failing that, at least like some perverted twig-smoker’s sick fantasy. Otherwise, your numerous accomplishments, trials, tribulations, victimisations, or really, anything you do in your life will mean sweet eff-A.

  26. Cassandra

    Carol- Her looks are not the reason for her adversity. Her looks are the reason SI cares about the adversity she has faced and overcome. No one wants to hear about a woman’s accomplishments unless she is sufficiently fuckable; this way teh menz have something nice to ogle at while pretending to care.

  27. ew_nc

    Very well-put, mearl. Besides, SI is to sports what M&M Mars is to fine chocolate.

  28. tinfoil hattie

    mearl,

    There are also no African Americans other than Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton.

  29. kate

    Exactly Mearl, women as a whole are to be ignored as their funciton is one of invisible, never ending servitude unless of course they ‘capture’ the ‘imagination’ of their male superiors, at which time they will be turned into objects of adulation, desire and possession.

    I seriously doubt the her ‘accomplishments’ would gain such ardent praise if not for the fact that a good portion of such involves her subjugation to the male gaze.

    I remember an article in a weight lifting mag once about the strongest woman in the world at the time, one photo of her sitting on a park bench, fully clothed. No other photos of her or coverage that I ever saw. I’m sure her refusal to be porntastic had something to do with that.

    No women can be accomplished enough to escape their bondage to the patriarchy entirely, not of course unless they eschew entirely popular recognition.

  30. Miranda

    She looks like an add for Grindhouse.

  31. Miranda

    Or ad, even, yeesh.

  32. Patti

    This is making me think about the word/concept of disabled. She is; I am not. Darned if I’d have a chance in hell of even matching her speed, though.

  33. doorknob

    Daisy, I am certain that they are. With the advent of Internet porn and the sexual libertarian view of “sexual freedom” (that is to say, freedom for whoever wants to fuck to fuck whomever they want in whatever way they want, whenever they want, and whoever doesn’t want to fuck must need therapy) ALL fetishes are becoming mainstreamed. In liberal youth culture they’re practically required.

  34. Border Heeler

    The criticizing or blaming of other women question is hard. If someone is praiseworthy for fighting oppression, is someone else not blameworthy for colluding? Ethically and theoretically, I struggle with this question a lot. So have a lot of other feminists: identification with the oppressor, false consciousness, selling out, sleeping with the enemy (literally or figuratively), being a fembot – all of these terms have elements of blame and criticism. Yet most feminists who talk about these things also clearly acknowledge that men are the ones who both control and benefit from patriarchy. Does that fact alone mean that women who collude rather than fight are not blameworthy? It is a really difficult question.

    I think that no man should ever criticize a woman for her choices regarding her resistance to sexism, no matter what. But as a woman, can I? What if her choices affect me or other women in our attempts to resist patriarchy?

    I can understand one element of Ms. Mullins choice – it can be a relief to trade in one type of sexist contempt you’ve lived with your whole life (you are a hideous monster because you are disabled) for a different type of sexist contempt (you’re a whore). Sometimes that lateral move actually feels “liberating” even though it is not.

  35. Mandolin

    ” ALL fetishes are becoming mainstreamed. In liberal youth culture they’re practically required.”

    Being a liberal youth, I tend to think that’s bullshit. Perhaps you are also a liberal youth, and the culture you are currently participating in does have an expectation of fetish? In which case, I bow to your experience.

    But from that comment, you come off as someone who is older and outside the liberal youth culture, and who is interpreting what goes on inside that culture with an outsiders’ — and I would dare even say incorrect — lens.

  36. Twisty

    Trust no one over 30, Mandolin!

  37. norbizness

    I’ve been to Liberal Youth Culture, the bar and occasional live music club in San Antonio, and there’s no more fetishization going on there that, say, at Sea World.

  38. Varnish Eater

    Well I’m 25 and fetish-free, and I think that doorknob is right. You don’t need an extreme one like an amputee fetish, but bondage, choking, spanking, etc. are all de rigeur – at the very least, you have to like porn.

    Otherwise you’re a prude!

    As for the topic of this post: I think the photo is beautiful, but I agree that if she were in running clothes on a track instead of wearing underwear in a wind tunnel, it might actually reflect her real accomplishments, and I found the accompanying article extremely irritating. The tone was flippant, like, “see, they’re almost human!” A pointless waste of words.

  39. Frumious B

    Criticizing collaborators is ok unless they are sex workers.

  40. Twisty

    Speaking of youth culture, skulking around in my neighborhood there’s a roving band of tall skinny boys in tall skinny pants who all look exactly like Joey Ramone. What’s up with that?

  41. Xana

    I love how threatened the patriarchy is by a strong, athletic woman so in turn she must be photographed in semi-erotic or blatantly erotic poses. Aimee Mullins is an inspiration and instead her photograph, while a track starting position, looks more like an underwear ad.

    Ah, how Mulvey has opened my eyes to the way the male gaze sexualizes and infantilizes us.

  42. littoralmermaid

    “victory for marginalized groups who have never enjoyed the fulfilling opportunity to celebrate their sexuality exclusively in terms of male approval.”
    I left a similar comment at the tail end on the last “Pose of the Week” thread, but I figured it’s applicable here, too.
    Even when women who aren’t traditionally beautiful – like disabled women, fat women, women of color, older women – are objectified and fetishized based on their sexual attractiveness, I don’t think they are really put on the pedestal with the traditional beauty.
    First of all, they have to fit the existing beauty standard as closely as possible. This disabled woman obviously would not be in SI if she was fat or had a less “photogenic” disability (ick); nonwhite beauties must be part white and/or have stereotypically white features; fat women must have conventionally pretty faces and be on the “thinner” end of fat (plus size models are usually a size 12 or 14, rather than a 26). That isn’t true victory even for sexual objectification of said group, when they must be as close to the ruling standard as possible.
    Plus, as far as I can see, marginalized groups don’t really get let in alongside the dominant ones, with regards to beauty. I blogged about pretty still being defined as a white woman. You may see nonwhite women in fashion magazines, but they aren’t “pretty”, they’re an alternate “exotic” flavor and their appeal is more about being sexually attractive (a horrible, racist, misogynist stereotype about overtly sexual women of color) than it is about aesthetics.
    For those reasons, I don’t even think it’s a victory. And even if it was, it would be for patriarchy, not for women.

  43. kreepyk

    Twisty, that is the Teh Emo.

  44. Twisty

    Emo? Is that crap still around?

  45. Varnish Eater

    I blame the Patriarchy for “Teh.”

  46. Patti

    “Speaking of youth culture, skulking around in my neighborhood there’s a roving band of tall skinny boys in tall skinny pants who all look exactly like Joey Ramone. What’s up with that?”

    You’re obviously too old or you’d know. You just wouldn’t understand.

  47. Antoinette Niebieszczanski

    Of course emo is still around; see James Blunt.

    Quoth Todd Rundgren about a hundred years ago, “If it’s stupid enough, it’s cool.”

    Or my 5-year-old nephew, upon being served turkey leftovers for the fourth time, “Do we have to eat this shit *again*?”

  48. Ramblin Rabbit

    Ok, I know the prosthesis she is wearing in the photo are incredibly strong, stable and can be used during athletic competition. But with the way she is posed they’re the equivalent of a four inch heel. She’s balanced rather precariously from the looks of it. Prove my point, what would they look like if she was posed standing, facing the camera directly, or in mid-stride running?

  49. Sara

    Daisy, to answer your question, I have to say that I pay as little attention to acrotomophiliacs (the fetishists you mention) as I possibly can. My introduction to them was via a year-2000 article on apotemnophilia (no longer available online without a subscription) which I found at the Atlantic Monthly website in 2003. This article was the first thing listed in response to an AltaVista search I’d run as my first step doing research to determine whether I’d rather have my leg off or die of cancer that year, which doctors had concluded by then were my only two immediate choices.

    Fortunately, my second result sent me to a prosthetics site showing a young woman who’d just climbed a mountain in her prosthetic leg. The blurb about her didn’t focus on her ass and say whether she’d ever modeled.

    Living as a woman, sexual objectification and obligatory attempted submission to fuckability/worth standards are implied, no matter what. The objectification I experience as an amputee is distinct from the objectification I experience as a woman in that it is not always sexual. For clarification of what I’m talking about, please see these posts:

    Talking Points: An Object Lesson at my site

    and these posts and their comments from the last Disability Carnival:

    Disabled Performing Pioneers by Marcy at Dirty Laundry

    and

    Disability and Media by Daniel at Medical Humanities Blog

    Whether we are talking objectifying amputees and other putatively or definitely disabled folks, women or men or children, sexually or otherwise, the problem is the same: people not seeing other people as people first but as objects and symbols they then have to be re-taught are human. I expect Twisty would say it all happens because of the dominance engine that fuels the patriarchy, though I also expect she’d put it better.

    You might think it’s only bad when you’re being sexually pornographied. However, there are lots of ways to demean people by objectifying them. Consider this: Yesterday, in walking from my car to the post office, maybe half a block, I had two perfect strangers come up to me and basically tell me I was a brave woman for leaving my house. One came up from behind asking “How’s the leg working out for you?” (And I was wearing really cute shoes!) The other one told me right to my face, with tears in her eyes — you know, instead of “Hi, how are you?” — “You’re a brave woman!”

    This kind of thing happens to me everywhere I walk. I would find it inhibiting if I weren’t already so shopworn.

    When I was young, I couldn’t leave the house without being pestered by some man about my tits and my ass. Now I can’t leave my house without being congratulated for my [projected] courage by complete strangers.

    The objectification escalates. And it’s all the same dynamic, even when it’s not strictly sexual.

  50. mAndrea

    I’m so sick of this sexist crap. S-E-X. That’s why it’s never going to end.

    I need a vacation from this misogynistic world. But do you realize there is absolutely no place on this earth
    I can go where sexism doesn’t exist? Or have it shoved down my throat a thousand times a day before I get there?

    The only place I can go to escape it is inside my own head, but it follows me even there.

  51. norbizness

    No fucking way that’s emo, emo is wearing Mister Rogers sweaters that are two sizes too small (in August) and visibly emoting to the crap lyrics of Sufjan Stevens.

    BTW, all like Joey? That’s a powerful weird-lookin’ group of aimless teens!

  52. lucizoe

    Did anyone else see the Emo Farm video? The farm had like, one to two-hundred head of Emo. Funny stuff, that.

    I’m real sick of being pornified. Every newsstand I walk past has one wall completely plastered with the covers of available magazines, covers displaying this month’s slab of female-meat-in-suggestive-pose. I have to give some credit to one of them, though. Title of “Ass.” None of this “Maxim” pretension.

  53. doorknob

    I am, in fact, a liberal youth (college student, 21, thanks). In my local liberal youth culture, it is pretty much assumed that everybody has some kind of fetish. You at least like to “enjoy erotic spanking” or “need to explore your submissive side”. “Vanilla” is pretty much an insult, meaning prude or frigid. For most of my sexual life I assumed that I must be submissive, and figured out that I wasn’t when I actually tried BDSM sex and found it uncomfortable and disturbing. (although I don’t just blame liberal youth culture for that one, I blame the entire patriarchy)

    If your liberal youth culture isn’t like this, sorry for assuming. But mine is, and for some reason it bothers me more than it probably needs to, I think because I feel like liberal youth are supposed to be my feminist allies, and instead, the ones around me are throughly pornulated.

  54. Niki

    I agree with Varnish Eater & Doorknob. You can really only be a part of liberal youth culture if you live in or near a progressive city, and if you do, you’ve no doubt encountered a push by your peers to be bisexual (for the eyes of men, if nothing else), to enjoy manga and other ridiculous Japanese girl-hate, and to engage in pornalicious activities that nicer, less ‘liberal’ girls might not partake of. Maybe where you live, Mandolin, you don’t really witness this putrid wave of liberal youth culture, but I engage with it daily.

  55. Antoinette Niebieszczanski

    What’s manga?

  56. Patti

    Manga is Japanese graphic novels, very sexual and violent. They have had strict rules against showing pubic hair – neatly circumvented by sexualizing young girls, who have none.

  57. Megan

    SI credits Mullins for the photos that accompany the article. The first five or so results from a Google image search for Mullins produce the same type of images or images that are even more porn-o-rific. She’s obviously controlling her image to a large extent.

    When she first gained fame as an athlete, she refused interviews that would not appear on sports pages. Then a few years later, she’s appearing mostly naked as the “cheetah lady” in a film and sending objectifying photos of herself to a “sports” magazine.

    IBTP for the fact that this former Pentagon intern and talented athlete felt like she had to turn herself into eye candy in order to be successful.

  58. Xana

    Patti: Not all manga is sexual and violent. It’s a very specialized niche called “hentai” that contains disturbing and graphic drawings of sexual acts. Most manga is artistic and creative that contains pretty boys, magical girls, or historical figures like samurai.

  59. Bird

    Actually, Patti, manga just means Japanese comics.

    Some manga are pornographic (often referred to as hentai), but many are not. Manga is simply the Japanese word for a comic or print cartoon.

  60. PhysioProf

    What’s “emo”?

  61. Bird

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emo_(slang)

  62. PhysioProf

    Yeah, I found the Wikipedia page, but it is very longwinded and oblique. Anyone care to offer a pithy one-sentence definition?

  63. Silvia Connolly

    Hi Twisty,

    I wanted to let you know that I’ve been reading your blog for a year and I think you’re fabulous. :) Perhaps one day you’ll have time to check out my new dark feminist blog.

    -silvia

  64. Patti

    I thought about that just after I blamed – yes, I’m aware it’s just comics. My bad. I was thinking in the context of the porn stuff. I do disagree about the sexualized/violent types just being the hentai niche. (is hentai just anime, or non-moving images, too?) I know men read the violent/sex manga right out in public, on the trains and such, and it’s very very common.

  65. Patti

    Oh, good wiki on hentai. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hentai

  66. Bird

    Emo=whiny hipster dudes in Converse sneakers with bad floppy hairdos

  67. PhysioProf

    Thanks, Bird, for that evocative definition! Now I know what to call (internally) some of my students.

  68. MzNicky

    Patti and Bird:
    On behalf of myself, I thank you for your service in translating whippersnapper-hip-speak for us elder blamers here at IBTP. I especially appreciate your doing so sans the sort of eye-rolling attitude blamers of a certain age commonly receive from computer help-line technicians.

    Now I’m going to go pour myself a Scotch. (Double, neat.)

  69. Mandolin

    Doorknob,

    I hear what you’re saying. I just think there’s something snide in the phrasing “almost required”… I mean, among other things it centers one kind of sex as “normal,” and tacitly poses any other kind as deviant.

    I occasionally hear conservatives say something like “it’s almost required that one try homosexuality” and it has the same ring to it, to my ear. I agree there are fetishists out and about, and that they like to discuss their fun, but I don’t think that implicates me any more than the presence of gay people is an inherent pressure on heterosexuals to slip off their skivvies and slip into bed with members of the same sex. Well, except inasmuch as people may be tempted by either behavior and dislike being reminded that temptation can be realized.

    I also agree that there can be communities of people whose attempts to claim a positive identity in re: their fetishism can take the form of denigrating others. That’s certainly a problem, but it really doesn’t describe normative behavior, in my experience. It seems to me like discussions tend to center on those kinds of behaviors, to the exclusion of other more positive behaviors, in the same way that discussions of feminism veer toward “what about the men?” It’s a point where the narrative about fetish (that it will be a focus of shame) is broken, and thus it feels worthy of remark.

  70. Mandolin

    (For the record, I also don’t think fetishists have much power in the young liberal circles that I travel. More than outside those circles, perhaps. But they’re still marginalized.)

  71. tinfoil hattie

    What’s “neat”?

    (kidding)

  72. The Reverend B. Dagger Lee

    Man, the one day that Miss Patsy comes here to look at the blog known as IBTP, and y’all are talking about amputee fetish manga.

    I’ll never get her back here.

  73. littoralmermaid

    Emo? I was up to my eyeballs in them during high school two years ago, but I had no idea till now that they were still around. Where I lived at least, the skinny jeans they wore were called “girl pants”.
    And Bird … hee hee.

  74. thebewilderness

    All I know about emo is that it is the place my fifteen and eighteen year old grandsons constantly ask each other if they are going. As in, “You’re not going emo on me, are you.” One of them is borderline goth, and the other, well, he has a style all his own, which I like very much, but causes a great deal of brow furrowing on the part of his parents.

  75. kate

    Amputee fetish manga hentai, as known by bored emos wrapped in skinny jeans, plodding on lonely suburban streets in converse while struggling with pornulated peer pressure.

  76. kate

    Is it just me or is Feministe down for the count? I went there but there’s no there. Will the site come back up again? Is this blog world that fragile? Why can’t Fox News go down like that? Can you tech people tell me how that works?

    i blame i blame

  77. Iris

    Yep, those tall skinny boys with tall skinny jeans and the eyeliner–they cry, but are just as misogynist as ever!

    I know ‘cuz they bag groceries at m’ store.

  78. citywood

    Yeah kate, apparently it might have something to do with something she wrote about a Dan Riehl article. They are discussing it in a similar thread at Pandagon.

    Shakesville is also down due to a DOS attack. They think it’s because she wrote something against rape! They are using the old blog at the moment.

    I mean WTF??

    (Sorry, OT. Back to lurking.)

  79. slythwolf

    Every newsstand I walk past has one wall completely plastered with the covers of available magazines, covers displaying this month’s slab of female-meat-in-suggestive-pose. I have to give some credit to one of them, though. Title of “Ass.” None of this “Maxim” pretension.

    Interesting. So basically, the magazine and its readership are under the mistaken assumption that it is a magazine for human beings who enjoy objectifying asses, when in reality it’s the other way around…

    As for the subject of the post: I think it’s really interesting that in general (there may be one or two exceptions, but I haven’t encountered them) when women who have accomplished anything are written up in just about any publication, the defining characteristic is that it’s a woman who’s done this. Holy shit, a woman wrote a book. Holy shit, a woman ran a race. The only time it’s not “Oh my god A WOMAN” is when it’s “Oh my god A BLACK WOMAN” or “Oh my god A DISABLED WOMAN” or “Oh my god A WOMAN WITH CANCER” or something of that nature. It’s obviously imperative to point out every single tiny deviation from the norm when recognizing any human being’s accomplishments, the norm of course being rich, white, able-bodied, middle-aged, healthy, and male. And this tends to leave one with the impression, reading any such article, that no one who isn’t rich, white, able-bodied, middle-aged, healthy, and male has ever done anything before.

    Except, you know. Do all the shitwork and then die.

  80. Isabel

    littoralmermaid: huh I always thought people talked about emo boys wearing girlpants because they wore pants designed for girls, i.e. found in the womens section… but now I realize it might just be this one slightly queer friend of mine that does that. Oops.

    I’ve always defined emo music–and I mean we may as well define emo kids by their music since that is how they define themselves–as like punk but with more crying.

  81. littoralmermaid

    slythwolf – “The only time it’s not ‘Oh my god A WOMAN’ is when it’s ‘Oh my god A BLACK WOMAN’ or ‘Oh my god A DISABLED WOMAN’ or ‘Oh my god A WOMAN WITH CANCER’ or something of that nature. It’s obviously imperative to point out every single tiny deviation from the norm when recognizing any human being’s accomplishments, the norm of course being rich, white, able-bodied, middle-aged, healthy, and male.”
    In general, even when you specify that someone is a member of a “not-normal” group (norm being defined as a rich white able bodied healthy male), I think people also assume that person belongs to all normal categories BESIDES the not-normal group. Eeek, this is probably really inarticulate.
    Like if you say “a black woman”, people will probably assume that she’s hetero and able-bodied, unless otherwise specified.

    Isabel – “huh I always thought people talked about emo boys wearing girlpants because they wore pants designed for girls, i.e. found in the womens section”
    Some of them did wear pants from the women’s section (one guy said that they were stretchier and more comfortable than men’s pants), but in general “girl pants” was used by non-emos to tease the emos.

  82. Bird

    My baby brother (age 20) is a Goth, and even he makes fun of the emo kids for being too whiny.

    You know you’re way too melodramatic when the Goths think you’re going a bit overboard.

  83. magickitty

    My young skateboard friends tell me that the “girl jeans” thing started because some boys, whilst trying for the skinny-jean look, actually wore girl’s jeans because they were cut tighter to the leg.

    All’s I know is that you will NEVER find me in skinny jeans, EVER. Or capri tights. I promise y’all.

  84. Daisy

    Kate askes:

    Is it just me or is Feministe down for the count? I went there but there’s no there. Will the site come back up again? Is this blog world that fragile? Why can’t Fox News go down like that? Can you tech people tell me how that works?

    I can’t get it to come up either. Anyone know what’s going on?

    Yes, more blaming henceforth.

  85. slythwolf

    In general, even when you specify that someone is a member of a “not-normal” group (norm being defined as a rich white able bodied healthy male), I think people also assume that person belongs to all normal categories BESIDES the not-normal group. Eeek, this is probably really inarticulate.
    Like if you say “a black woman”, people will probably assume that she’s hetero and able-bodied, unless otherwise specified.

    Oh god yes. That’s it exactly. And if you say “a lesbian”, people assume she’s able-bodied, white, healthy, probably they assume she’s middle-class (because the default for men is “rich” but the default for women isn’t–weird), etc. And people will say, “But most people are straight. Most people are able-bodied,” or whatever. As if that justifies their bullshit assumptions. This system that we have of default assumptions about who other people are has to be the most insidious form of oppression because most of the time we don’t even know we’re doing it.

  86. buggle

    Re: Feministe-go to Pandagon for the latest-looks like some idiot crashed their boards, because Jill had the nerve to say something he didn’t like.

  87. TinaH

    So I showed this picture to Nigel, who said “That is way oversexualized.”

    As I pinned the Obvious Award to his manly breast, I thought to myself “I still need to do some work on the Train Your Own Nigel for Fun, Profit and Blameability Home Study Kit.”

  88. Frumious B

    It’s obviously imperative to point out every single tiny deviation from the norm when recognizing any human being’s accomplishments, the norm of course being rich, white, able-bodied, middle-aged, healthy, and male.

    I get your drift here, really I do. However, how do we make it known that it is not just white, able-bodied males who accomplish things if we do not point out when a person of accomplishment does not fit that mold?

    ps, Feministe is back up.

  89. Rikibeth

    Heh. Have a look at http://www.yourscenesucks.com, if you want a laugh along with a field guide. The Mister Rogers sweaters are Prehistoric Emo. The tall skinny boys in tall skinny jeans are the current incarnation. And they’d probably prefer to be called “scene.”

    And they started out by buying their trousers in the womens’ section to get suitably close-fitting ones, but now the manufacturers have caught up to the trend, and they’re making super-skinny low-rise jeans in men’s sizing now. I tried on one pair in the men’s-sizing numbers I usually wear, and they fit GREAT, except that they’d been cut with room for a guy’s package! Their junk CAN’T be that big. Pfft. And I really liked the striped denim with the zippered calves, too.

    I’m a fan of tall skinny boys in tall skinny jeans, but after a certain point, I just think they need a sammich.

  90. PhysioProf

    “Heh. Have a look at http://www.yourscenesucks.com, if you want a laugh along with a field guide.”

    All I can say is, “I feel old”. It is, perhaps, also worth pointing out that there is some blameworthy content on that site.

  91. MzNicky

    PhysioProf: No shit. That site would make my daughter feel old. Although now I have some clue why my nephew gets all tricked up like he does — it’s the “screamo frontman” “scene.”

    Even the way I’m using quotation marks in this comment makes me feel old, so I’m going to go take a nap.

  92. bobbinL

    For the record, I think that Calphalon’s pink bakeware is in support of breast cancer research, and that a portion of the proceeds from said bakware is going toward said research.

  93. Antoinette Niebieszczanski

    PhysioProf, I feel ya!

    Also, it reminded me that I don’t live in a heavily infested scenester city. So unfashionable, dontcha know.

  94. Rikibeth

    PhysioProf: I’m pretty old too. One of the things I’ve tried to do is to explain to my twelve-year-old daughter that the site is meant as MOCKERY, not as an instruction manual!

    And of course there’s blameworthy content. Isn’t there most places?

  95. wiggles

    First on the list of awesomeness items: She’s hot.
    I’ve never understood why beauty and good looks are regarded as towering accomplishments and not the random genetic flukes that they are.

  96. Hillary

    How dare that woman feel good about her body! If she can’t embrace bitter victim-hood, then she should be forced to wear a burkha so that she can’t be objectified.

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